Eight in 10 Americans reevaluating their health priorities due to the coronavirus pandemic – The Sun

EIGHT in 10 Americans are reevaluating their health priorities due to the coronavirus crisis that has left millions infected, new research shows.

Sixty-two percent of the 2,000 people surveyed admit they did not take their health seriously enough before the COVID-19 pandemic.


Seven in 10 say they are using self-isolation as an opportunity to hit the reset button and improve their health.

The survey found 59 percent of respondents said the main thing they are focused on improving during self-isolation is eating healthier.

The research was conducted by OnePoll on behalf of cellular health product Tru Niagen.

"Now more than ever we are conscious of our health,” said Rob Fried, CEO of ChromaDex, the makers of Tru Niagen.

“When choosing health-related products, please choose trusted brands with proven safe, clinically verified products.”

Seven in 10 people admit they have struggled to stay positive and motivated while they are stuck at home – so it’s no surprise that 41 percent are using this time to focus on improving their mental health.

Nearly half of those surveyed say they have been spending time in the kitchen to boost their moods and stay busy.

Others are staying busy by watching TV, redecorating their homes and taking time to meditate.

 

Respondents say they have been able to squeeze in three-and-a-half hours of exercise each week and have been taking at least two walks a day to stay active.

Nearly half of the respondents say they have made daily walks a family activity.

More than three-quarters of those surveyed said they are focusing on how to improve their immune system more than ever before to better protect themselves from the virus.

Source: Read Full Article

Who is Octavia Blake in The 100? – The Sun

POST-apocalyptic drama The 100 is coming to an end with it's seventh season which premieres on Wednesday, May 20, at 8pm on The CW.

Fans of the show will be pleased to see the return of their favourite characters for the final 16 episodes, including discovering the fate of Octavia Blake played by Marie Avgeropoulos after the series six cliffhanger.

Who is Octavia Blake in The 100?

Character Octavia Blake is part of the original 100 and has been in the sci-fi drama from the start.

She was sent to juvenile lockup for being a second child which was against the law on The Ark.

Fans have followed the roller-coaster storylines of the controversial character – from the innocent young girl under the floorboards to the ruthless Blodreina.

Octavia didn't grow up in close quarters with the other Delinquents on the space station.

As the station only allowed one child per family, Octavia was kept secret and her mother hid her under the floor.

When she was a teenager, Bellamy tried to give her a night of freedom at a masked party, but unfortunately, they got caught and they demoted Bellamy and executed their mother.

Octavia was then marked as a Delinquent and spent the rest of her teens imprisoned.

She turns out aggressively rebellious after being trapped for so long and clashes with her brother Bellamy.

Once her brother becomes a leader for Skaikru and Octavia becoming a Grounder, their relationship deteriorates. When Octavia then becomes the leader of Wonkru, Bellamy comes back to the surface to see his little sister a bloodthirsty red queen.

On the ground, Octavia fell in love with Lincoln which brought out the best in her – until Pike executed him and sent the character on a dark path.

Octavia was the first to adapt to the Grounders and began to understand their language and culture.

She became the space crew's translator and guide and eventually accepted as a member and perfecting her combat skills.

She later takes revenge on her lover's killer and murders Pike and in doing so changes her bond with her brother forever.

Despite the darkness and hatred within Octavia, fans still get a glimpse of the goodness in her – when the Grounders held the Final Conclave, she volunteered to represent Trikru.

She prevails as the new leader and decided that 100 people from each clan could enter the bunker, saving each clan's best people.

They would call this new clan Wonkru, a positive mix of all the 13 clans.

The tensions in the bunker rise to new levels, so to combat an all out war, Octavia ran regulated fights.

This let her people release their violent urges and cleverly eliminate any opposition.

Her ruthless and violent tactics earned her the title of Blodreina, the Red Queen.

After Wonkru emerged from the bunker after six years, they met Madi, a young Nightblood ready to rule.

Instead of fighting for her post, Octavia gave up her leadership and gave Madi command.

The finale of season six ends on a cliffhanger as to whether Octavia survives.

After entering a mysterious code tattooed on Octavia's back into what maybe be the key to the Anomaly, a green mist descends on Gabriel's camp.

A grown-up Hope appears and luring friend Octavia in for a hug – she stabs her in the stomach and Octavia dissolves into a green mist…

Actress Marie Avgeropoulos once dated Twilight star Taylor Lautner

Who is Marie Avgeropoulos?

Marie is a 33-year-old Canadian-Greek actress and model, born on June 17, 1986 in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

She rose to fame starring in the 2010 movie I Love You, Beth Cooper.

Marie was then cast as Kim Rhodes in the film Hunt to Kill.

Early in her career, she appeared in TV shows such as Supernatural, Fringe, Human Target and Eureka.

In 2013 she got her big break after being cast for a recurring role in The CW's Cult and then sci-fi show The 100, portraying Octavia Blake.

Marie dated Twilight star Taylor Lautner from 2013 until 2015 after meeting on the set of the movie Tracers.

The actress missed the 2018 Teen Choice Awards after being arrested for felony domestic violence against her (unknown) boyfriend.

TMZ reported at the time that a man called the police saying his girlfriend hit him during a verbal argument.

Source: Read Full Article

Seven in 10 say people should be able to REFUSE to go back to work

Coronaphobic Britain: Seven in 10 say people should be able to REFUSE to go back to work even when lockdown eases – and 63% insist parents should NOT be fined if they keep children off school

  • Boris Johnson will unveil the UK’s coronavirus exit strategy with ‘easements’ to lockdown on Sunday night  
  • Poll for MailOnline finds public resistance could be one of main obstacles to getting country up and running 
  • Nearly two-thirds believe that ending lockdown too early is a bigger concern then immediate GDP meltdown 
  • The easing of measures is expected to follow a five-step roadmap with lockdown lifted entirely in the Autumn 
  • Monday is expected see garden centres reopen and workers return to businesses that have remained open 
  • However, plans may change if the UK is hit with a deadly second wave of the virus after restrictions are eased 
  • UK official death toll now over 30,000 – highest in Europe – but trends suggest that number could be higher
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Coronaphobia could end up thwarting Boris Johnson’s efforts to ease lockdown – as a poll today suggested the public fears the virus far more than immediate economic meltdown.

Exclusive research for MailOnline shows 62 per cent are more worried about the effects of the draconian curbs ending too early, while 38 per cent say their main concern is the havoc they are wreaking on the economy now. 

Around seven in 10 believe bus and train drivers, teachers, and medical staff should have the right to refuse to go back to work, even if the government says it is safe.

Some 60 per cent say the state should keep covering a proportion of people’s wages even if in theory they should be able to resume their jobs.

Nearly half say they could even support strike action if people are ordered to get back to work.

Two third also reject the idea that parents who refuse to send their children to school over coronavirus fears should face truancy fines. 

The extraordinary findings, in new polling by Redfield and Wilton Strategies, comes as Boris Johnson prepares to take the first steps towards loosening the restrictions.

The shape of the ‘new reality’ Britons face is starting to emerge, with the ‘stay at home’ mantra expected to be ditched, curbs on outdoor activities eased and businesses encouraged to find ways to get back up and running amid social distancing rules.  

But Mr Johnson is due to announce an ‘exit strategy’ on Sunday laying out immediate ‘easements’ to the misery of combating the deadly disease.

The gravity of the situation the UK faces was underlined today as the Bank of England warned GDP will plunge nearly 30 per cent over the first half of this year, and unemployment could hit 9 per cent.

The overall 14 per cent slump estimated for 2020 would wipe around £300billion off output and represent the worst recession for more than 300 years. Extraordinarily, former chancellor Alistair Darling warned this morning that the Bank might have been too optimistic. 

In other breakneck developments in the coronavirus crisis today:

  • The UK today announced a further 539 coronavirus victims, as the official death toll rose to 30,615; 
  • The PM will address the nation to announce plans for the next phase of lockdown at 7pm on Sunday night;
  • Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab told the Downing Street briefing tonight that the approach will involve setting ‘milestones’ when measures can be eased;  
  • Chancellor Rishi Sunak has announced a £32million funding injection so doctors and chemists can stay open over the May bank holiday tomorrow; 
  • Ministers are facing demands to get a refund on PPE equipment they boasted about sourcing from Turkey after it emerged it has failed safety standards; 
  • Ministers have blamed the dramatic fall in daily tests from 122,000 to 69,000 on a ‘technical issue’, despite complaints that the figures were manipulated to make it look as it Matt Hancock’s target was hit last week; 
  • Being obese may double the risk of needing hospital treatment for the coronavirus, according to a major study. 

In a poll for MailOnline, nearly two thirds rejected the idea that parents who refuse to send their children to school over coronavirus fears should face truancy fines

More than three quarters said they would be behind bus drivers who made the ‘personal decision’ to stay off because of safety fears, with just 16 per cent saying they would not support them

Exclusive research for MailOnline shows 62 per cent are more worried about the effects of the draconian curbs ending too early, while 38 per cent say their main concern is the havoc they are wreaking on the economy now

Six in 10 thought the government should continue to subsidise some of the wages of workers who declined to go back, against just 24 per cent who said they would not favour such a move

Boris Johnson made his return to PMQs in the House of Commons on Wednesday after a six week absence. He conceded that the UK’s coronavirus death toll is ‘appalling’ but is set to push ahead with the easing of lockdown restrictions

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon took an axe to the UK’s united front on coronavirus as she insisted there can be no loosening at all for at least another week – and suggested it will be largely unchanged in Scotland for the rest of the month

A Cabinet minister blamed a massive slump in coronavirus testing in the last few days on ‘a bit of an issue at the labs’ today amid mounting criticism of falling numbers.

Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis said ‘a technical issue’ was behind a 43 per cent fall in completed daily tests between last Thursday and yesterday.

His comments came after it was revealed last night that 69,463 took place in the 24 hours to 9am that day, raising concerns over the progress of the testing regime.

The figure is just 57 per cent of the 122,327 tests that Matt Hancock boasted had been carried out on Thursday to meet his pledge of 100,000 tests conducted per day by the end of April. 

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer warned this morning that the lockdown should not be lifted until ‘many, many more tests’ could be done.

Mr Lewis told Sky News today: ‘There has been a bit of an issue at the labs, there’s been a technical issue. 

‘That’s not surprising with a completely new test and a new diagnostics system we’ve put in place. 

‘But that technical issue is now dealt with so we’ll see that capacity and demand levels coming up.

‘But the capacity has remained over demand and above 100,000.’

Ministers have hailed increased testing as vital for allowing the lockdown to be eased from next week and kick-start the economy. 

While the capacity for testing remains above 100,000 per day there is mounting pressure on the disparity between the capacity and the number actually completed.

Dominic Raab tonight announced there is ‘no change’ to lockdown rules yet – but confirmed Boris Johnson will unveil the country’s exit strategy on Sunday.

The Foreign Secretary said the restrictions will not be loosened yet, and urged Britons not to take advantage of sunny weather forecast for the Bank Holiday weekend.

But he risked confusing the situation by saying the PM will spell out ‘milestones’ that will permit moves to loosen the draconian curbs in an address to the nation on Sunday.  

He told the daily Downing Street press briefing that initial changes will be ‘modest’ and ‘incremental’ – and could be reversed if the disease starts to flare up again. 

‘The virus is not beaten yet, it remains deadly and infectious,’ Mr Raab said.  ‘This weekend the Prime Minister will set out the next steps which we can responsibly take over the following weeks, guided by the scientific advice and mindful – as we said right from the word go – of taking the right decisions at the right time.

‘Now we can start setting out how we will live and work whilst maintaining the necessary social distancing rules, we can also be clear about those measures which are still necessary to prevent a second peak.’  

Mr Raab said the rate of infection – the R value – was between 0.5 and 0.9 and the number of new coronavirus cases and daily death toll were both ‘steadily falling’. 

Earlier, Nicola Sturgeon laid into Mr Johnson over plans to loosen the shackles, warning that ditching ‘stay at home’ guidance at this point would be ‘catastrophic’. 

The First Minister took an axe to the UK’s united front on coronavirus as she insisted there can be no loosening at all for at least another week – and suggesting it will be largely unchanged in Scotland for the rest of the month. 

The PM is expected to set out the next phase of the response to the crisis in an address to the nation on Sunday night. He said yesterday that ‘easements’ will be outlined to the restrictions.  

Meanwhile, Labour’s  Keir Starmer has suggested lockdown must stay in place until testing capacity is much higher – after daily numbers slumped below 100,000 again. He said a track and trace regime was critical for controlling the outbreak, and ‘if that’s going to happen the planning needs to go in now because we need many many more tests than we’ve got already’.

The stay at home message will be replaced with a ‘be careful when you’re out’ mantra, according to one Cabinet minister, who added that the easing of lockdown will be based on how much each step of the plan affects the rate of infection – or R. 

Sunak hands GPs and chemists £32m to open on Bank Holiday 

Rishi Sunak is handing £32million to GPs and chemists to ensure they open on bank holiday tomorrow. 

The Chancellor, himself the son of a doctor and pharmacist, has announced that practices will be reimbursed for treating it as a normal working day.

Community pharmacies will be directed to open from 2-5pm. 

Mr Sunak said: ‘Growing up, working in my parent’s pharmacy in school holidays, I saw how much the local community depended on them in times of need.

‘GPs and pharmacies are providing a vital service to patients across the country during this unprecedented outbreak – which is why we ensuring they can remain open on the Bank Holiday.

‘I want to thank doctors and pharmacists for all their hard work fighting coronavirus – we are so grateful to them.’ 

The government is thought to have drawn up a draft 50-page blueprint to gradually ease lockown in staggered steps between now and October. 

This blueprint is expected to lead to a five step roadmap to see Britain leave lockdown completely by Autumn – but an ’emergency brake’ could be applied if a second wave of the deadly virus arrives.

But Ms Sturgeon insisted she would ‘not be pressurised’ into lifting measures prematurely, and would act in the best interests of Scotland. 

Ms Sturgeon said: ‘The decisions we take now are a matter of life and death and that is why they weigh so heavily.’

She said lockdown restrictions will not be formally reviewed again for three weeks, although she stressed changes were possible before then.

She suggested no changes at all will be possible for at least another week. 

‘In particular I want to see what our estimates of cases and the R number look like a week from now,’ she said.     

She said ‘media reports’ over the easing of lockdown measures have not been discussed with the Scottish Government but a call with the devolved nations will take place later today.

‘I will not be pressured into lifting measures prematurely,’ she said, adding that she strongly believes that to drop the ‘clear, well understood’ stay at home message could be a ‘potentially catastrophic mistake’.  

In a round of interview this morning, Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis frantically tried to play down expectations on the scale of the easing, saying ‘although we believe we are through the peak of this virus we are very cautious to ensure that we don’t get a second peak’. 

UK faces worst recession in 300 years, warns Bank of England 

UK GDP will slump by 14 per cent this year as coronavirus inflicts the worst recession for three centuries, the Bank of England warned today.

In a grim assessment, the Bank said the economy could shrink by nearly 30 per cent in the first half of this year before recovering some ground.

But the impact of the deadly disease will continue to be felt long afterwards. Unemployment could hit 9 per cent before falling back again. 

The overall 14 per cent fall in output estimated for 2020 would be the biggest recession for more than 300 years. 

The Bank says it believes there was a 3 per cent contraction in the first quarter, and sees GDP plummeting by an incredible 25 per cent in the current three month period, before finally clawing back some ground. 

Announcing that interest rates have been kept on hold at a record low of 0.1 per cent, Governor Andrew Bailey said it was acting to ease the effects as much as possible and tried to strike a more optimistic tone by saying there would be limited economic ‘scarring’.  

But in another bleak sign this morning, former Chancellor Alistair Darling warned that the Bank might be too optimistic about the prospects for a quick recovery. 

The poll, carried out online yesterday as part of the Global Health and Governance Opinion project, suggests public resistance will be a major obstacle for the government in the coming weeks and months.

Some 62 per cent said they were most worried about the lockdown being relaxed ‘too quickly’, while 38 per cent said their biggest concern was about the economic impact of the curbs lasting ‘too much longer’. 

Even if the government loosened lockdown in line with scientific advice, there was strong support for workers being able to refuse to go back.

More than three quarters said they would be behind bus drivers who made the ‘personal decision’ to stay off because of safety fears, with just 16 per cent saying they would not support them.

The poll found the same for train and Tube drivers by a margin of 69 per cent to 22 per cent, while for teachers it was 71 per cent to 21 per cent. The figure for both doctors and nurses was 73 per cent to 19 per cent.

Six in 10 thought the government should continue to subsidise some of the wages of workers who declined to go back, against just 24 per cent who said they would not favour such a move.

The public was more split over whether people should go on strike if they are told to resume work, with 45 per saying they would endorse the step and 38 per cent against.

Nearly two-third said parents fearing coronavirus should not be punished for refusing to send their children to school when they reopen, against 26 per cent who thought truancy fines would be fair. 

Boris Johnson will not announce the ‘exit strategy’ – which is expected to include a five-point plan for easing lockdown – until Sunday

The Prime Minister will host a Cobra emergency meeting with leaders in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland on Sunday in the hope of agreeing a UK-wide approach. 

He is pushing ahead despite admitting the UK’s official death toll, which surpassed 30,000 yesterday and is the worst in Europe, is ‘appalling’.   

Mr Johnson said in the Commons yesterday: ‘We have to be sure the data is going to support our ability to do this. 

‘That data is coming in continuously over the next few days. We want, if we possibly can, to get going with some of these measures on Monday.

‘It would be a good thing if the people had an idea of what’s coming the following day, that’s why Sunday, the weekend, is the best time to do it.’   

The Bank of England today warned that GDP will slump by 14 per cent this year as coronavirus inflicts the worst recession for three centuries.

In a grim assessment, the Bank said the economy could shrink by nearly 30 per cent in the first half of this year before recovering some ground.

But the impact of the deadly disease will continue to be felt long afterwards. Unemployment could hit 9 per cent before falling back again. 

The overall 14 per cent fall in output estimated for 2020 would be the biggest recession for more than 300 years. 

The Bank says it believes there was a 3 per cent contraction in the first quarter, and sees GDP plummeting by an incredible 25 per cent in the current three month period, before finally clawing back some ground. 

Announcing that interest rates have been kept on hold at a record low of 0.1 per cent, Governor Andrew Bailey said it was acting to ease the effects as much as possible and tried to strike a more optimistic tone by saying there would be limited economic ‘scarring’.  

The Bank of England today estimated a 14 per cent fall in GDP for 2020 – which would be the biggest recession for 300 years

Unemployment could hit 9 per cent before falling back again, according to the Bank of England

In its latest assessment, the Bank said the economy will shrink by nearly 30 per cent in the first half of this year before recovering some ground

But in another bleak sign this morning, former Chancellor Alistair Darling warned that the Bank might be too optimistic about the prospects for a quick recovery. 

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Lord Darling said: ‘I think the Government has to be flexible about the furlough plan because if you’re going to get people to go back to work I think it is highly unlikely they are all going to go back to work on day one.

‘We need to have flexibility so people can go onto short-time work and be gradually reintroduced to their jobs.

‘But can I also make another point which I think is important – I hope like everybody else that many jobs come back and people go back to work, but I think we must plan on the basis that some jobs will not come back, at least they won’t come back at anything like an acceptable rate.

‘And that means the Government has also got to announce a plan for jobs.’ 

Lord Darling added: ‘What I do think is the Government’s furlough scheme was a very good scheme, it was just what was needed, but it needs to be adapted now.

‘But we have to accept the fact that it will take time for people to go back to work and the economy is not just going to open up like that.

‘I have my doubts about what the Bank of England are saying today about that – it is going to take time.’

In a round of interviews this morning, Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis said the figures showed the UK faced a ‘very difficult time’. 

‘This is going to be a very difficult time for our country, it is a difficult time for countries around the world,’ he said.

‘And that is why it is important that, as we start to look at what the other side of the virus might be, one of the key things for us will be looking at how we can safely ensure that people can start to get back to work so that our economy will have a chance to blossom and grow again in the future and as quickly as possible once we’re the other side of this virus.’ 

Source: Read Full Article

Top 10 highest earning Instagram stars in Premier League includes shock with Arsenal outcast Ceballos top – The Sun

DANI CEBALLOS is not even a fully fledged Premier League star – but no one in the English top flight earns more than him from Instagram.

The 23-year-old Spaniard is on loan at Mikel Arteta's side from Real Madrid – with the Gunners being told they will need to shell out £44m to sign him permanently.

But what he may lack on the pitch he certainly more than makes up for in earning potential off it.

Surprisingly, Ceballos is far and away the Premier League's top earner on the photo-sharing site, according to data from Online Casinos.

They looked at a player's total number of promotional posts since the start of this season and coupled that with information from a recent report into influencer marketing.

Combine the two and Ceballos – who has 1.9 million Instagram followers – has amassed a huge £101,193 so far this season.

That equates to a very healthy £2,927 a WEEK.

And it is enough to put him a long way clear at the top of the table, with Manchester United's Andreas Pereira in second, despite him being one of five players Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is looking to sell.

He has made £94,214 from his posts since the season began, working out at £2,725 a week, according to the report.

Man City's Ilkay Gundogan rounds out the top three with earnings of £80,257 from posts to his 2.7 million Insta fans.

Man Utd have the most popular players, with Brandon Williams (sixth with £66,299) and captain Harry Maguire (ninth with £55,831) also cracking the top ten.

That means there are three Red Devils stars in there, with Chelsea and Everton the next best represented clubs with two each.

Paul Pogba leads the league with the most Insta followers, 40.2million, but the Man United ace has made only £12,212, while Liverpool's Mo Salah has only netted £2,261 despite having 37.6million followers.

The research suggests neither has prioritised monetising their accounts, even though there is clearly a fortune to be made from it.

Unsurprisingly, United dominate the list of the top earning squads.

They have bagged a cumulative £543,185 since the season began at a rate of £15,712 a week.

Chelsea are second with £540,277, Arsenal third with £373, 706 and Man City fourth on £369.846.

Liverpool – some 25 points clear at the top of the table, are fifth with £313,401.

Burnley's social media-shy stars come bottom by almost £20,000, with the club making just £9,684 from Insta posts since the start of the season, according to the report.

The total money made by all Premier League clubs from Insta since the start of the season is £3,322,467 – or £96,104 a week.

Source: Read Full Article

10 Celebrities Who Were Born Filthy Rich

For some celebrities, fame and fortune came after putting in years of hard work and time. But there are others who grew up privileged, and then made their way into show business. From pop stars to actors, here are 10 celebrities who were born filthy rich.  

Ariana Grande

Ariana Grande is a singer, songwriter and actress who is known for her chart-topping music. She started her career on Nickelodeon’s Victorious and went on to become one of the biggest pop stars in the world. 

But before she rose to fame, Grande was still living well. Her father, Edward Butera, owns a Boca Raton graphic design firm. And her mom, Joane Grande, is the CEO of a manufacturing company called Hose-McCann Communications. Before she made it big, Grande attended some of the finest private prep schools in Florida. 

Anderson Cooper

Anderson Cooper is known as a CNN journalist who’s covered some of the most newsworthy events in the last 20 years. But the 52-year-old was born into one of America’s most prominent families. 

Cooper is the son of famed fashion designer and heiress Gloria Vanderbilt. His maternal great-great-great-grandfather, Cornelius Vanderbilt, was a railroad and shipping magnate who became one of the richest people in American history. 

Zoë Kravitz

Zoë Kravitz is a celebrated actress who’s known for her performances in hit series and movies like Big Little Lies, The Divergent Series, Mad Max: Fury Road, and the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them series.

But before she became an actress, Kravitz was already living a life in the spotlight. She is the daughter of The Cosby Show star, Lisa Bonet, and Grammy-winning singer, Lenny Kravitz. 

Salma Hayek

Salma Hayek is an A-list Hollywood celeb who’s appeared in some of the most popular movies of the last two decades. For her work in the 2002 film, Frida, the actress was nominated for an Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, Screen Actors Guild Award, and BAFTA Award.

But before her Hollywood success, Hayek was living a luxurious life and attending prestigious private schools. Her father, Sami Hayek Domínguez, is an oil company executive. And her mom,  Diana Jiménez Medina is a talent scout and opera singer. 

Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Seinfeld star Julia Louis-Dreyfus is a multiple Emmy Award-winning actress who recently wrapped up her popular HBO series, Veep. But before hitting it big in Hollywood, Louis-Dreyfus was living a pretty affluent life. 

Her great-great-grandfather, Léopold Louis-Dreyfus, was a French shipping magnate who founded the Louis Dreyfus Group. At the time, he had one of the richest families in France. The actress’s father Gérard Louis-Dreyfus, is the billionaire chair of the family company. 

Rashida Jones

Rashida Jones is an American actress who’s known for her role on the NBC sitcom, Parks and Recreation. She also appeared in films like I Love You Man, The Social Network, and The Muppets

But Jones was already living a cushy life before becoming a successful actress. Her father, Quincy Jones, is a legendary music producer who has 28 Grammy Awards and 80 nominations. Jones grew up in the famed Bel-Air neighborhood of LA and attended some of the most prestigious schools in the country.

Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal

Siblings Jake and Maggie Gyllenhaal are Hollywood favorites. Jake appeared in popular films like Brokeback Mountain, Nightcrawler, and Spider-Man: Far From Home. Maggie is an award-winning actress who’s known for her work in projects like Crazy Heart, The Dark Knight, and The Honourable Woman

But the Gyllenhaal’s didn’t just fall into their careers. Their parents, Stephen Gyllenhaal and Naomi Foner are Hollywood filmmakers who’ve written and directed Emmy, Golden Globe, and Academy Award-nominated films. Their mother, Naomi, won a Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for her 1988 film, Running on Empty.

Emma Stone 

Emma Stone is an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning actress who’s been celebrated for her performances in films like La La Land, Birdman, Easy A, and The Help. But before she made it big in Hollywood, the actress was living quite well. 

Her multi-millionaire father, Jeffrey Charles Stone, is the CEO and founder of a general-contracting construction company.  Growing up, Stone went to prestigious prep schools and was lucky enough to get private acting lessons from notable Hollywood coaches.

Armie Hammer

Armie Hammer is an American actor who’s been in a number of popular films, including The Social Network, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., and Nocturnal Animals. For his role in the 2017 film, Call Me by Your Name, the actor received a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. 

But before becoming a famous actor, Hammer was living a pretty cushy life. His paternal great-grandfather, Armand Hammer, was a famous American oil-tycoon and billionaire business magnate. Armie’s dad,  Michael Armand Hammer,  is chairman and CEO of the Armand Hammer Foundation and also runs several other successful businesses.

Source: Read Full Article

No 10 'told not to publicise PPE shipment from Turkey'

Downing Street ‘told not to publicise PPE shipment from Turkey’ in case it didn’t turn up before minister Robert Jenrick’s embarrassing announcement about gowns and masks which took days to arrive

  • Officials  reportedly warned that an announcement could backfire 
  • But Mr Jenrick announced the consignment from Turkey on Saturday evening
  • Education Secretary Gavin Williamson had to reveal it was delayed following day
  • Planload of gowns eventually arrived on Wednesday, three days later than billed 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Downing Street ignored a Department of Health  warning not to announce the imminent delivery of vital safety equipment from Turkey which later turned into a farce by taking days to arrive, it was claimed today.

Senior officials reportedly warned No 10 and Communities Minister Robert Jenrick that any public confirmation of the plane-load of personal protective equipment (PPE) for NHS staff battling coronavirus could backfire.

But Jenrick was authorised to announce its imminent arrival on Saturday, a decision which sparked major embarrassment when it became clear it would not be ready in time.

It finally arrived in the UK yesterday after an RAF aircraft was sent to Istanbul and the Turkish Government stepped in to gift equipment because the firm paid to deliver it was unable to do so.   

It comes amid an apparent rift between Matt Hancock and Downing Street, with No 10 officials accused of lining up the Health Secretary as a ‘fall guy’ for coronavirus failures. 

A Department of Health Source told the Guardian: ‘We strongly advised Robert Jenrick against doing this but he and No 10 overruled us. 

Communities Minister Robert Jenrick was authorised to announce its imminent arrival on Saturday, a decision which sparked major embarrassment when it became clear it would not be ready in time

An Airbus A400M at RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire yesterday that is believed to have carried the PPE supplied from Instanbul

It comes amid an apparent rift between Matt Hancock and Downing Street, with No 10 officials accused of lining up the Health Secretary as a ‘fall guy’ for coronavirus failures

‘The advice we gave as a department as that we shouldn’t mention individual orders of PPE. But for whatever reason it wasn’t followed.’ 

However a source close to Mr Hancock said that this description of events was ‘wrong’. 

The first of a hoped-for three flights from Turkey landed at RAF Brize Norton in the early hours of Wednesday after collecting a shipment of equipment including 400,000 badly needed surgical gowns. 

Mr Jenrick announced with fanfare on Saturday that the consignment – enough to keep the NHS supplied for several days – was coming, before Education Secretary Gavin Williams humiliatingly admitted the following day that it had been postponed.

He voiced hopes that it would arrive on Monday but it took an additional two days to arrive. 

Fury over coronavirus PPE shortages is escalating amid claims the government was ignoring offers of help from businesses – and millions of pieces of PPE are still being shipped out of the UK in spite of the lack of equipment for NHS frontline staff.

Reports suggested that the Government missed out on 16million facemasks for the NHS after ignoring offers from two major firms

Source: Read Full Article

Japan has 10,000 coronavirus cases days after declaring state of emergency

Japan officially recorded 10,000 cases of the coronavirus on Saturday, as the deadly pandemic continues to sweep across the globe.

The news was confirmed by state broadcaster NHK and comes just hours after a full state of emergency was declared for the nation at large, Reuters reported.

So far, Japan has not been as hard hit by the virus as China, the United States or several nations in Europe. Only around 200 deaths have so far been reported, but Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is urging residents to stay home amid fears that rural health systems could fail as cases spiked.

The COVID-19 outbreak has already upended Japan, forcing the country to postpone the 2020 Summer Olympic Games, which had been scheduled to take place in Tokyo. Some in the city are now calling for a glittering Olympic Village constructed for the games to be converted into a homeless shelter.

So far, more than 156,000 have died of the deadly virus worldwide, with more than 2.2 million cases.

Source: Read Full Article